Creators

Welcome to the Creators page!

We hope to bring you interviews, previews, blogs and more from everyone involved in our books, so watch this space and please spread the word.

***

With the launch of ‘Serial Artist’ due in a month we thought it about time that you were introduced to the brains behind it!

A huge round of applause for Robert Randle and Kevin Storm!

Introduce yourself.

kevin storm_portrait

 

Kevin Storm, 33 years old and living in the Netherlands. Guitarist, Music Producer and Comic book artist.

Basically any medium that allows me to get a story across has my interest.

 

 

*

rob randle_portrait

 

Robert Randle, 35 and living in Baltimore, Maryland.

My background’s in illustration and writing, but my day job is working in the field of digital comics.

 

 

 

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

KS: I’ve been drawing comics since I was a kid, but really got back into it in 2008, when I made a concept rock album that intertwined with a comic book. I wrote the music and the story, but felt that the album alone wouldn’t be enough to really get the story across. I decided to make a comic book to go along with it, very abstract and moody. That really got me back into the game and basically that’s how I met Robert Randle. After finding out we had that same unnamable, unsatisfied feeling with the general state of the world, we decided to act upon it and see if we could do something together. It was never really that I wanted to work in the comics industry, more that I wanted to tell stories and help stories be told. The further we got into the process of actually making this book, the more I got into it and over the years I’ve done quite a few underground stories and contributions to anthologies. I like stirring things up with photography and breaking some general comic book rules.

RR: I didn’t really start my love affair with comics until I was in art school, but I started working in the comics industry right out of college, though more on the business side of things. Before my current job at iVerse Media, I was a buyer for Diamond Comic’s Previews Catalog. Over the years I dipped my toe into a few different projects, but I also had a number of false starts and so Serial Artist is the first published book that I authored. This book Kevin and I worked on ended up being very special so I’m actually quite proud this will be the first thing anyone will really get to see from me.

Tell us about your book.

9781909276185RR: On the surface, Serial Artist is a crime story about a self-alleged serial killer who has claimed to the world that the subjects of his gallery paintings are his murder victims and the clues necessary to solve his crimes are hidden in his artwork. And as expected the world goes crazy in response. But it’s far more than a whodunit murder mystery, the story is more about the people who are affected by these claims… from the scandal-hungry media that devours every detail, to the distraught families of his alleged victims, and of course to those intent on investigating him, everyone gets pulled into this web, and is changed by it. I think we managed to work in some pretty unexpected twists and turns along the way, and turn a couple tropes on their heads in surprising ways. I think overall we managed to create a pretty scathing satire of modern culture, but again that’s all surface, which for plenty of readers is enough. There’s more going on than meets the eye, and to us that’s where the magic of this book really lies, but a casual reader won’t need to dig too deep to just enjoy the read.

KS: Serial Artist is something I can’t really explain. I really think everyone will take home something else from it. Robert is the political conspiracy know-it-all storyteller, and I’m the overly sentimental brokenhearted artist. We both poured all of our soul into this and it’s the combination that makes the book what it is. To me, as an artist, the book is the puzzle. There’s the story, the general plot and all the beautiful and incredibly relevant subtext that Robert wrote into this, put to me it’s the link with the I’Ching (chinese divinatory system with cards) that really makes it special. Each and every panel in the book corresponds in some way to the description of the I’Ching card. Think of it as a deck of tarot cards, and what the card says, is what happens in the book. Robert and I followed it religiously and tore away from it atheistically every now and then, for more impact. It’s the thousands of symbolics we hid in the pages that really makes this special. It IS indeed a puzzle, and those who care to actually look into it just a little won’t believe how the hell we pulled this off. Because even WE don’t fully understand how we managed this. Believe me when I say we’re not blowing our own horn here. It’s simple magic that happened and we were a part of it. Having made and lost friends in the process of this book is something I will always remember and that is now forever locked in these pages. Some of these pages hurt to look at, others make me laugh uncontrollably. I had so many great moments making this book and it really has been my life these last few years. I’ve grown to hate it and love it again and now that it’s being published I just want to show the world how much we tried to really make something that matters.

Who/what are the major influences on your work?

KS: Both Robert and I really are inspired by Alan Moore. Aren’t we all? I had the absolute privilege of meeting with him and handing him Serial Artist, and to hand it to Steve Moore (no relation). Steve is an I’Ching guru and I absolutely love his writing for comics. Steve and I have become friends in the process and he’s been an inspiration since. The man cannot be credited enough. Art-wise, I’d say Dave McKean has had an influence on my style if only for the simple fact that combining photography and comics CAN be done without looking plain silly. That’s something I really hope I’ve managed to pull off, but I guess that’s not up to me to decide. I love heartfelt stories like “Blankets” by Craig Thompson and I love most of the old Vertigo stuff. There are some really twisted books in their back catalogue that will scare the crap out of you.

RR: Mr. Moore is a real inspiration for me for a whole number of reasons, but I have a lot of other influences as well, and some I’m probably not even aware of. It was really a former teacher of mine, Stephen John Phillips (Veils, I Paparazzi) who was the first to show me what was possible with the medium of fumetti, and I realized Serial Artist is the ideal sort of story to take on in that medium, so I guess he was a big influence on this particular book.

What are your favourite comics and graphic novels?

KS: I don’t really follow or collect comics that much anymore. There are some great Batman books out there and some real gems in the underground scene too. One guy you’ve probably never heard of is Ibrahim Ineke, a guy I met at a comics convention here in the Netherlands. He makes what he calls “Islamic Gothic” and is a DIY bookmaker. He xeroxes his drawings over and over and over until they become something else entirely. Very abstract, and very real. Also I follow artists like Mahmud Asrar and Becky Cloonan on Instagram for their sketch work and walk into the comic book store every other week or so to have a look at the new stuff.

RR: Of all time? I’m probably boring, I like the classics. Watchmen, Dark Knight, Arkham Asylum, Hellboy, Sin City, Preacher, Hellblazer, Ex Machina, stuff like that. But I do love indy books (even less-than-indy books like Walking Dead) and my bookshelf is full of stuff by everyone from Chris Ware to Jhonen Vasquez. I also especially love European Comics (I grew up on an unhealthy diet of Heavy Metal) and so concerning Alexandro Jodorowsky and Moebius (and Alan Moore of course) I’m slightly more than just a fan of their work. I’m a big believer in being able to separate an artist from his work, but when I respect a creator like Jodorowsky or Moore not just for their work, but for the philosophies they live by that inform their work, to me that’s a different level of special.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to break into the industry?

RR: Well, digital is changing the playing field, and there are all different ways to “break in” (where in print the old gatekeepers are still mostly in place). As far a print goes, I think you’re going to see more consolidation of publishing houses at the top, and the indy publishers stretched even thinner… but with social media tools, print on demand services, and programs like Kickstarter, a lot of the former barriers of entry are being removed. For people shopping for a publisher my best advice is to have a completed project to show. It should be as close to print-ready as possible. The more uncertainties about the final product you can remove from a potential publisher’s mind, the better your chances. You may think you’ve got the greatest pitch in the world (and maybe you do) but any number of things might prevent you from finishing a project, so you want to be ready out of the gate when you start shopping your work around. I say this from experience, I once had a publisher interested in a series of mine just based on a script and some concept art, but then my artist had to go off and have a whole professional career with people actually paying him to draw comics, and our book ended up going nowhere. So I mean it, get it in the can.

KS: I guess it’s that same old cliche of just putting in the work. Hundreds of people will tell you they all have these brilliant ideas for stories or books. Only one or two of those will actually put in the effort and spend all the years and years to really make it happen. I’d like to think I inspire people to try. My best friend Koen Romeijn (who plays Geir Nitty in the book) has just finished his first science-fiction masterpiece. I’d like to think I motivated him just a little bit to simply go for it. So if you’re that guy, you probably already have more to say on the subject than most people around you. Believe in your own passion and let your stories matter. Make it personal. Break the rules. Oh, and if you’re doing photographic work, tell your actors NOT to get new tattoos in the process, or shave beards they’ve had for years. It’s such a drag painting beards and tattoos. And if you can get your actors to fall and break their face, like Ray Tarree (Justin Cachets) did prior to his first photo shoot, that helps too. Of course I don’t mean that, but that stuff did really happen and counting on people to help is always a risk. Anything you can do yourself, or learn how to do, even just the basics, you should do. So learn pre-press, learn the lingo, have a look at the old masters.  But always, always follow your heart.

Websites

www.serial-artist.com

www.stormstudio.com

www.markosia.com/titles/serial-artist

 

***

Next up is the super-multi-talented Meirion Jones, creator, author and artist on ‘Christopher Marlowe & The Bards of Nemeton’, one of the most dynamic books you will get to read this year, coming to you in late November.

MJ pic

Introduce yourself.

I trained as an illustrator when Photoshop was just a twinkle in Mr Adobe’s eye.  After graduating I locked my creative half in the basement and followed the line of least resistance to become a marketing consultant.  A few years ago the other half escaped and I’ve since lived a double life – advising City of London executives on business strategy by day, and scraping at a drawing board like a fevered lunatic by night.  My two worlds are now bleeding into each other: I use storytelling and drawing extensively in my executive coaching; while my next comic is about a super-villain called Hedge Fund Manager Man.

 

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

No matter how secure you’ve made that basement door the creative half will escape.  The stronger the locks, the more explosive it’ll be when it gets out!

 

Tell us about your book.

It’s your basic science-fantasy-psycho-druidic-archetype-manifesting-time-travelling-quest-pursuing-chase-thriller.  It’s about Christopher Marlowe – a less wholesome contemporary of Shakespeare – who genuinely believed he was descended from Merlin (hence the similarity in names).  In my story he unwittingly inherits huge powers and is hunted by two dark forces that have been at war against each other since the dawn of time and who want use him as the ultimate weapon of mass destruction.  The book is about him learning to use his powers while staying one step ahead of his enemies.  It takes in pagan and gnostic mysticism, string theory and psycho-analysis.  There’s also a lot of fighting, disgusting profanity and many things blow up.

 

Who/what are the major influences on your work?

Like the other creators on this page the influences are many and varied.  I read a lot of science fiction as a kid but my first lightning-bolt-through-the-forehead experience was reading one of Michael Moorcock’s Corum books when I was thirteen.  Consuming the entire Eternal Champion run in one summer was a formative experience.

Just as a lot of today’s music bobs along in the wake of the sixties and seventies – Beatles, Stones, Zeppelin, Pistols etc – today’s comics owe a huge debt to the titanic outpouring of comics creativity between 1963 and 1976.  It’s this group – including Kirby, Steranko, Smith, Colan, Brunner, Starlin, Gulacy – that have had the biggest impact on my sensibilities.  If you want to see my particular sci-fi and comics influences have a look at the dedication at the start of my book.

 

What are your favourite comics and graphic novels?

Certain runs of Marvel comics of the early and mid seventies stand comparison with the very best of today’s books.  Steve Englehart was the prototypical comic writer.  His Dr Strange (with artists Frank Brunner and Gene Colan) anticipated Gaiman’s Sandman by twenty years.  Steve Gerber’s socio-satirical work in Defenders, Omega and Howard the Duck pre-dates the themes of individual alienation, the corruption of power and the celebrity cult that Alan Moore would explore from Marvel Man, through Watchmen and onwards.  And Jim Starlin in his Warlock book set a standard for mind-messing, time-travelling science fantasy that no one has matched.  As for today’s books, Ex Machina is the 21st century’s singular masterpiece.

 

What advice would you give to someone who wants to break into the industry?

I was hoping someone would tell me!

 

Websites

www.bardsofnemeton.com

(or www.clientcritical.com if you need a corporate marketing strategy)

Christopher Marlowe cover

***

Next up is the Apollo Creators Interview!!!

Check out this fantastic interview with Erik von Wodtke and Douglas A. Sirois, creators of the extraordinary “High-Art” Graphic Novel, entitled Apollo. This new title is set for release on the 13th of October at the 2013 New York Comic-Con!

Click on the banner for info on how to pre-order the Paperback Edition as well as the 2013 NYCC Large-Format Hardcover Exclusive Collectors Edition.

Apollo banner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***

Next up for a grillin’ is Devin Hylton, creator and writer of ‘Switched’, a unique sci-fi tale unlike anything you have ever read!

          

Introduce yourself! - just a paragraph about yourself

My name is Devin Hylton, I am from Ashcamp Kentucky.  I have always been creative or tried to be a contrarian thinker. I won a state wide poster contest and several other things when I was in elementary school and really went from there.  I got an undergraduate degree from Morehead State University as well as Graduate Degree from the University of Kentucky. I have always been interested in anything creative from making up stories, to inventing gadgets to slogans, anything really.  I got into the comic book business with a few small stories, and then I had a couple of Properties Optioned by Los Angeles Based, Platinum Studios, a Comic Book to Film Adaptation Company, responsible for Men in Black Films as well as COWBOYS & ALIENS starring Harrison Ford & Daniel Craig. From there, I took some time off for school, but I got back into it, now I have projects acquired by everyone from Markoisa Enterprises to several from Arcana Studios. I have a number of other endeavors both in comics, film and outside of those worlds, that I am very happy and hopeful about.

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

Remarkably, I was never a huge comic book fan growing up; I always loved creative stuff though.  I had originally wanted to write screenplays and still do.  At the time I started writing the film business was primarily a geographic business. So given that and some other factors, I started searching out other mediums where I could tell my stories, and Graphic Novels and Comic Books were a natural fit and I have been writing them ever since.

Tell us a bit about your book?

Switched is about two babies (one an alien & the other normal) that are Switched at Birth and each grows up in circumstances that are foreign to them and must endure the pain of alienation and hurt. Everything switches up, when it is discovered that they may be the only ones that could hold the key and far ranging intergalactic conspiracy that could destroy the galaxy and only they can save it, but can they get over the years of pain & alienation to be able to accomplish this goal.

Who/What influences your work?

Basically anything and everything influences me that aren’t necessarily tied to comic books, I have a lot of hobbies and interests and I love things that maybe considered mundane or a part of everyday life, that one thing could infuse itself and become the main plot device or an important part of my work.

What are your favorite comics/graphic novels?

I personally love the vertigo titles and anything that is non superhero with the exception of Batman. I always like to challenge myself and I think far too many people find it easy to simply copy what is already popular ( zombies & superheroes)  I want to do something DIFFERENT.

What advice would you give someone who wants to break in to the industry?

As I mentioned above, DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT. I’ve always believed the old adage that if you do what you have always done, you will get what you have always gotten. I think that applies to stories as well, dare to be different, to be inventive in your narratives, and come up with things that are different. The people doing Superheroes or Zombies are really good at it. Invent your own genre that could at least set yourself apart and get yourself noticed. The rest of my advice would be to simply work hard, yet be smarter than your competition, which dovetails with my notion of doing something different. I can’t stress that enough. GOOD LUCK!

Links to your website/works

http://movies.ign.com/articles/122/1220441p1.html

http://www.amazon.com/Red-Light-Devin-Hylton/dp/192691483X

http://www.amazon.com/Dive-Devin-Hylton/dp/1926914902/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1343234058&sr=1-2

***

Next up, one of our girls explains how she gets inspiration from looking at tiles! Maggie Lewinowicz is co-creator of the fabulous Kindred Spirits:

    

Introduce yourself!

I’m Maggie, a perpetually escapist daydreamer. I love making up stories as much as reading them and getting lost in a great story is my idea of paradise. 

 

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

That was an almost natural shift from doing illustrations and writing novels in the past to combining the two into comics. My illustrations never told enough of my characters’ story and my novels said way too much! Comics are a wonderful mix of the two.

Tell us a bit about your book?

Kindred Spirits is a strange little mix of various things and ideas; a quirky jumble of inner fears, fantasy and reality. It starts out one thing and ends up another. It is very colourful but dark at the same time. Ultimately I hope people are entertained by it. 

Who/What influences your work?

Anything and everything. I once got inspired by looking at bathroom tiles in a club. But what drives me is mostly frustration that the stories I see out there do not go the way I want them to. So, it is only natural that I must make my own.

What are your favourite comics/graphic novels?

Tough one. I had so many favourites for so many reasons but I guess the one that keeps impressing me to this day is Blacksad. After that it’s a long list of Manga that contains anything from Berserk to Skip Beat. I can never stick to just one style or genre.

What advice would you give someone who wants to break in to the industry? Eep! I’m not really qualified to give advice, I hardly know the ropes myself…

Links to your website/works

my webcomics

http://www.smackjeeves.com/profile.php?id=50299

my dA
http://jigokuneko.deviantart.com/

 

***

Cy Dethan is up next, creator and writer of many Markosia books, including Cancertown, Indifference Engine, White Knuckle and Slaughterman’s Creed among them!

 

Introduce yourself!

I’m a British writer and I’ve been working in comics since 2006. My first professional gig was the Starship Troopers: Extinction Protocol monthly strip I wrote for Mongoose Publishing between 2006 and 2008, and since then I’ve been primarily focusing on creator-owned graphic novels such as Slaughterman’s Creed, White Knuckle and the Cancertown books.

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

I was pretty much exactly the right age in the eighties to be hit between the eyes by the likes of V for Vendetta, The Adventures of Luther Arkwright and Maus. Getting that level of concentrated exposure to the possibilities offered by the medium ensured that a future outside of comics was never going to satisfy me.

Tell us a bit about your book?

I’ve written quite a few titles for Markosia now. Cancertown 2: Blasphemous Tumours, for example, is my sixth creator-owned project for the company, and I’ve written two more in the time it’s been in production. Cancertown 2 is my first sequel, and as such it’s all about fulfilling a series of “prophecies” laid down in the first volume. It’s also an opportunity for me to break all the toys I spent so much time and effort building and producing something new from the rubble, which I’ve found immensely rewarding.

Who/What influences your work?

I guess I’d have to say that most of my influences come from outside comics. I’d point to novelists like William Gibson, directors like the Coen Brothers and the non-fiction work of Mark Brandon “Chopper” Read as inspirational to some extent, but I don’t think you could lay the blame at any one door.

What are your favourite comics/graphic novels?

That, for me, is a virtually impossible question to tackle. We’re talking about an entire medium, not any specific genre, so it’s like asking whether you prefer ice cream or steak – different stories feed different hungers.

What advice would you give someone who wants to break in to the industry?

Pitch with passion. If you love your stories, give people every opportunity to share your excitement over them.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that there’s only one way into the business. Cheat the system wherever possible. Don’t assault the front gates when the back door’s unguarded. Your talent is a lock-pick, not a battering ram.

Above all else, treat all advice about breaking in with scepticism. People can succeed without the first clue about how they did it. What worked for them may not for you, and you may have tools in your toolbox that they didn’t have.

Links to Cy’s website/works

Blog: http://www.raggedman.com/

Web: http://www.cydethan.com/

 

——————————————————————————————————–

Leonardo Ramirez, writer and creator of ‘Haven’ is next up on the rostrum!

Look out for his novel ‘The Jupiter Chronicles’, especially if you are a fan of steampunk!

Introduce yourself!

I’ve been writing prose for over 20 years but I’ve been reading comics since I was a kid and have loved them ever since.  The most fun I have is when I’m meeting people at cons and appearances. It’s also quite the learning experience.

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

I’ve loved comics all of my life but never thought in a million years that I could ever be involved. In fact, when I was a kid, my stepmom threw away all of my comics when I went to visit. I even started out writing prose but lo and behold, my first published book ever is a graphic novel. I love it.

Tell us a bit about your book?

Haven is a continuation of the Dante Alighieri history (which is outlined all through the book) where, in present day, the mantle of the one who will stand against the nine circles of hell falls to Haven Irena Dante. And when the “Aristocracy” tries to kill her, she is forced to make a choice at the point of death: to return and save her alienated father or stay in paradise. She chooses the former and when she returns, she is different. I’ll also be releasing a prose version of the book some time in the spring which goes into where she was for the missing two years of her life.

Who/What influences your work?

Life experiences and the hardships we endure. My wife was attacked at gunpoint and survived. Haven suffers a violation and has to suffer the emotional consequences of that tragedy. Adversely, I don’t like to focus on that and the story be all doom and gloom. It’s about persevering and eventually conquering those things that we don’t want to face.

What are your favourite comics/graphic novels?

I lean towards the silver age DC stuff. I was also very much into the Dark Horse “Tales of the Jedi” series which I enjoyed very much.

What advice would you give someone who wants to break in to the industry?

Finish your story first. Then be prepared to work hard. And when you get your first book out know that it’s not the end of your struggle. It’s only the beginning.

Links to your website/works

http://leonardoverse.com

http://www.facebook.com/armyofhaven

 

***

Next up is Andy Briggs!

 

Introduce yourself! - just a paragraph about yourself

Andy is a screenwriter, graphic novelist and author – writing on movie projects such as “JUDGE DREDD” and “FREDDY VS JASON” and “FOREVERMAN” for Spiderman creator Stan Lee and legendary producer Robert Evans. He went on to work on Warner Bros. “AQUAMAN” – while at the same time landing an eight-book deal with Oxford University Press for “HERO.COM” and “VILLAIN.NET”. His graphic novels include KONG: KING OF SKULL ISLAND, RITUAL and DINOCORPS.

He has recently rebooted the classic character TARZAN, with his new books TARZAN: THE GREYSTOKE LEGACY and TARZAN: THE JUNGLE WARRIOR.

 

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

As a reluctant reader, it was comics that dragged me kicking and screaming into the world of literature. Now, I want to try and give that gift to somebody else.

 

Tell us a bit about your book?

I enjoy writing a range of material. I write horror movies, so RITUAL came from wanting to work that idea into something a little more than just a screenplay. DinoCorps came out of a passion for all-ages stories – why restrict a story for a specific market? Plus, who doesn’t like Dinosaurs with guns?

 

Who/What influences your work?

I’m heavily influenced by travel. I like to go to places off the well-beaten track so I can be inspired by other cultures. I don’t know if travel broadens the mind, but it certainly influences it!

 

What are your favourite comics/graphic novels?

I’m a sucker for the old Silver age Marvel comics. Nothing specific (although I would veer towards Spidey and Daredevil). There was something in those old comics that has yet to be recaptured. Plus they could tell a story in a single issue rather than a million-part cross-over serial….

 

What advice would you give someone who wants to break in to the industry?

The amount of people you meet who are writing a comic/screenplay/book is quite staggering. You seldom hear anybody say they’ve finished writing one. Finish your story. Period.

 

Links to your website/works

www.andybriggs.co.uk

@abriggswriter

 

————————————————————————————————————————————

Next up is Mark Bertolini, who’s book Long Gone will be in comic stores near you any day now!

Introduce yourself!

My name is Mark Bertolini. I’m a creator and writer of comic books based just outside Toronto, Canada. I spend the eight months of winter holed up in a bunker, creating comics. I’m a New York Times bestselling creator, part of the FUBAR: Empire of the Rising Dead anthology.

What made you want to work in the comics industry?

I’ve been reading comic books since I was five years old. I always wanted to create comics, originally I wanted to draw comic books but never had the patience or technical skill necessary, so I made the switch to writing, and suddenly had some success. Harvey Pekar said it best “Comics are words and pictures. You can do anything with words and pictures.”

Tell us a bit about your book?

My graphic novel is called Long Gone, it’s a post-apocalyptic story about deranged superhumans committing worldwide genocide, and wiping out humanity. The story follows one survivor as he attempts to exact bloody revenge against the super-powered monsters.

Who/What influences your work?

My biggest influences in comics are writers like Warren Ellis, Garth Ennis, and Brian K Vaughan. But my children are my biggest influence, as they’re both getting into comic books and love superheroes and creating their own comics.

What are your favourite comics/graphic novels?

My favorite comic of all time is Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon’s Preacher. It changed the way I looked at comics forever. I’m also a huge fan of Warren Ellis’s twisted superhero takes like The Authority, Black Summer, and No Hero. Also, Y: The Last Man is a brilliant piece of world-building, and a masterclass on cliffhangers.

What advice would you give someone who wants to break in to the industry?

Never stop creating. If one thing doesn’t work, move on to something else until you find that one piece of work that breaks through. And start small! If you have a 100-issue epic, don’t star there. Do small anthology pieces, work up submission packages, get involved in the small press community. A lot of creating comics is building relationships with other creators.

Website/Works

Breakneck (creator/writer) from 215 Ink (http://215ink.com/site/portfolio/breakneck/)

FUBAR (writer/contributor) from Alterna Press (http://fubarpress.com/)

My blog (http://markbertolini.wordpress.com/)

Find me on twitter @mark_bertolini

 

———————————————————————————————————————————————

 

We start with Paul Salamoff, creator of Discord.

 

 

Comments are closed.